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EJMINT Editorial, 2013: 1327000117 (4th July 2013)

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ESMINT statement regarding the UEMS Training Charter for Interventional Neuroradiology
Christophe Cognard, István Szikora
EJMINT Editorial, 2013: 1327000117 (4th July 2013)

ESMINT statement regarding the UEMS Training Charter for Interventional Neuroradiology

EJMINT Editorial, 2013: 1327000117 (4th July 2013)
Christophe Cognard, István Szikora
Keywords: , ,

The UEMS Division of Neuroradiology has produced a document titled, “Training Charter for Interventional Neuroradiology”.  The Charter precisely describes the way future interventional neuroradiologists must be trained.

The UEMS Training Charter for Interventional Neuroradiology is fully supported and endorsed by ESMINT for the following reasons:

  1. Interventional Neuroradiology (INR) (endovascular) is an emerging medical activity that has, until now, been practiced in Europe (and worldwide) by medical specialists coming from different specialties, but without specific training. With the development of increasingly complex treatments for intracranial aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), dural fistulas, spinal vascular malformations and with the increasing use of endovascular treatment in the setting of acute ischemic stroke, it is necessary that competent and skilled physicians provide appropriate treatments to patients. Thus, specific training is necessary for physicians who want to practice INR and this training is defined in the UEMS Training Charter.
  2. The UEMS Training Charter clearly indicates that all physicians (singularly neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists and neuroradiologists) can be trained in INR, which reflects the current situation in Europe and the rest of the World where INR physicians come from different specialties. It seems essential for the future of INR that all specialists receive the same training and that individual specialities do not organise their own training (interventional neurology, endovascular neurosurgery, interventional neuroradiology, etc.).
  3. The Training Charter is appropriately based on four years full time training including one year of Clinical Neuroscience, one year of Diagnostic Neuroradiology and two years of INR. Clinical and Diagnostic Neuroradiology knowledge is mandatory to practice INR and, according to the large field of complex procedures included in INR, two years training for INR is appropriate.
  4. The knowledge-based objectives are precisely and extensively described and cover the entire necessary field from basic neurosciences to therapeutics.
  5. Important topics like ethics, research, requirement for training institutions and certification are also appropriately described.


Christophe Cognard – ESMINT President
István Szikora – ESMINT General Secretary